TKD Timeline

Discussion in 'Tae Kwon Do' started by TKDstudent, Aug 17, 2012.

  1. TKDstudent

    TKDstudent Valued Member

    Taken from: grtkd.com
    I did a quick search when looking for when TKD became official Olympic sport & came up with this. I thought it could be used as a start of a timeline, with others free to add to it. This does obtain some inconsistencies.


    Taekwon-Do is a Korean art of self-defense. Contrary to the teachings of many of my fellow master instructors, practitioners and predecessors, Taekwondo did not originate thousands of years ago in ancient Korea. Rather, Taekwondo is a collection of similar unarmed martial arts techniques and foundations created by a number of Korean Grandmasters, including General Choi Hong Hi, when they returned to Korea from Japan following World War II. While in Japan, these Grandmasters learned Karate-Do (meaning way of China Hand or way of Empty Hand) and the techniques they learned formed the basis for a new martial art. On April 11, 1955, General Choi, then a general in the South Korean army, began to unify and systemize these related martial arts disciplines by giving Taekwondo its name and its beginnings. In 1961, General Choi became the first President of the Korea Tae Kwon Do Association, and until his death in 2002, he worked tirelessly and selflessly in the promotion of Taekwondo and in the scientific advancement of Taekwondo techniques.

    Below you can find a more detailed list of the highlights of the development of martial arts on the Korean peninsula from ancient times until the present. As you will see, Taekwondo is not a martial art that was developed by one single person, nor can it be traced back to any one individual. Instead, Taekwondo is a discipline that has scientifically developed into a system of various theories, terminology, techniques, methods, rules and spiritual foundations. As a result, the discipline, or the Way, can be constantly improved upon by its senior practitioners and instructors. This flexibility allows my fellow teachers and I to teach the fundamentals of Taekwondo to new generations, and the next generation of teachers can in turn teach the Way of Taekwondo to following generations, in each case adapting Taekwondo to the changing times and students, while remaining true to the founding tenets. I consider Taekwondo to be a living art of self-defense that will continue to evolve for years to come.

    It is an unfortunate reality that martial arts are often attributed to a single person or claimed by a particular nation. This usually results from the selfishness of individuals or the nationalism of governments, with something to gain by claiming that they practice the original or pure form of a particular martial art. In particular, dictatorships are prone to these types of claims. However, teachers of Taekwondo and other martial arts need to do their part to correct these misnomers by teaching their students the history of their particular style of martial arts. It is important that students be taught the truth about the fundamentals of the martial arts that they study, in order to get the most out of their training. It helps no one if instructors try to make martial arts the product of one nation or try to imbue martial arts with mythological backgrounds and lineages of thousands of years.

    The following highlights the history of martial arts on the Korean Peninsula:

    751 A.D.: At Sok Kul Temple, a statute of Kumgang Yuksa, a famous warrior, was erected in a martial arts fighting stance in a small Buddhist cave during the reign of King Hye-Gong (742-762).

    935 to 1392: During the Koryo Dynasty, the fighting art Taek Kyon was founded

    1147 to 1170: Soo Bak Ki is believed to have peaked in popularity. This was during the reign of King Uljong. Some historians believe that it was during this period that nei-chia or nae-gong (internal kung-fu) and wai-chia or wae-gong (external kung-fu) was introduced in Korea. This time period corresponds to China's Sung and Ming Dynasties.

    1392 to 1907: Yi Dynasty. Some historians of Karate believe that envoys from Okinawa learned Soo Bak Ki from mainland China and introduced it to Okinawa. A book on Soo Bak Ki was published during the Yi Dynasty to act as a training aid for the military.

    1921 to 1945: Karate (also known as Do-Te or Okinawa-Te). During the years of Japanese occupation in Korea, the practice of fighting arts was banned.

    1936: The concept of "Do" was introduced and "Karate" became "Karate-Do."

    1945: Korea is liberated from the Japanese. Quite a few Koreans (e.g. Choi Hong Hi, Ro Byong Jik, Lee Won Kook and more), who practiced Karate in Japan, brought their martial arts training back to Korea after World War II.

    In 1945, the first organization to teach martial arts in Korea, Cho Sun (Korean) Yeon Moo Kwan, which was to influence Taekwondo, was formed. Judo, Karate-Do, Gom-Do (swordsmanship), Kwon Bop (Chuan-Fa in Chinese and Kenpo in Japanese) were taught.

    1945 to 1955: Taekwondo Kwans (associations) were formed: Chun Do Kwan, Ji Do Kwan, Moo Duk Kwan, Oh Do Kwan, Chang Chung Kwan, Kang Duk Won and Song Moo Kwan. The name Taekwondo was created on April 11, 1955. For ten years, however, Taekwondo was also called Gong Soo Do (meaning empty hand), Tang Soo Doo (meaning Chinese hand) and Soo Bak Do (meaning fighting hand).

    1961: The Korea Tae Kwon Do Association was founded, recognizing the nine Kwans. It then changed it name on September 16, 1961 to the Korea Tae Soo Do Association and then changed back to the Korea Tae Kwon Do Association on August 5, 1965.

    1962: On June 20, the Korea Athletic Union recognized Taekwondo as one of its national competitions.

    1964: On September 3, Taekwondo was officially recognized by the Korean Athletic Union as a national event with seven weight categories.

    1966: The International Taekwondo Federation was founded.

    1971: The International Taekwondo Federation reached 67 countries.

    1972: The Kukkiwon was founded.

    1973: On May 28, the World Taekwondo Federation was founded. The First World Taekwondo championship at the Kukkiwon was held. By then, Taekwondo was being practiced in 108 countries and 200 instructors were teaching in schools around the world.

    1980: The International Taekwondo Federation introduces Taekwondo to Poland, the former Soviet Union and North Korea.

    1994: Taekwondo becomes an official Olympic event.

    The growth of Taekwondo around the world from 1955 until now has been astronomical. As a result, in 1994 Taekwondo was recognized by the International Olympic Committee as an official Olympic event and in 2000 it debuted as a medal sport at the Sydney Olympic Games. The true Grandmasters of Taekwondo around the world deserve wide recognition for their untiring efforts in the promotion of Taekwondo, and credit for the tremendous success and acceptance Taekwondo has received.

    However, Olympic fame is not Taekwondo's primary purpose. Perhaps traditional original Taekwondo may be better for the future.
     
  2. StuartA

    StuartA Guardian of real TKD :-)

    Cool (and thanks)... perhaps you and Andy could have editted the inaccuraces first though :)

    I find this bit misleading
    because AFAIA they were simply Korean version of Karate and apart from the competition related changes mentioned in the other thread.. remained as Karate - or am i wrong here? And even if I am.. were they actually attempting to become 'Taekwondo' anyway!

    Stuart

    Ps. I also notice that the year TKD was actually named.. isnt put on its own text line!!! Weird that!
     
  3. TKDstudent

    TKDstudent Valued Member

    Quote:
    The name Taekwondo was created on April 11, 1955. For ten years, however, Taekwondo was also called Gong Soo Do (meaning empty hand), Tang Soo Doo (meaning Chinese hand) and Soo Bak Do (meaning fighting hand).

    Su Bak Do did not come till much later, late 50s, early 60s. It was derived from Su Bak Hi, which was most likely some sort of game/sport by GM Hwang Kee. Since this name Soo Bak Hi was in an old Korean book, he used this as the basis for coming up with his name Soo Bak Do, feeling this was an authentic label for his KMA connected to Korea's long & glorious past, which he, Gen Choi & other TKD leaders were very proud of!

    There is much mis-leading about so called histories of TKD & for many reasons, national pride being one of them. The terrible politics of a divided Korea & the nastiness of the leaders of Korea being another one!

    One thing that some look to do is cloud or hide the FACT that Gen Choi & his followers named their system TKD in 1954 & applied it continuously from that time forward till present, with all TK-Din keeping them name in the future. The plain truth is that the soldiers under Gen Choi's command & leadership were indeed using the name TKD for what they were doing since 1954. Others did not until 1965, 1971, 72, 73, 78 or never! So we have 2 or more entities using the same name, that had common roots, but took different paths forward, under different leaders.
    Again, we would not have a problem with history if it was TAEKWON-DO & TAESOODO, right?
    Additionally if we look at it today as TAEKWON-DO & TAESOODO, we would not have these problems either, right?
     
  4. TKDstudent

    TKDstudent Valued Member

    Taekwon-Do is a Korean art of self-defense. Contrary to the teachings of many of my fellow master instructors, practitioners and predecessors, Taekwondo did not originate thousands of years ago in ancient Korea. Rather, Taekwondo is a collection of similar unarmed martial arts techniques and foundations created by a number of Korean Grandmasters, including General Choi Hong Hi, when they returned to Korea from Japan following World War II. While in Japan, these Grandmasters learned Karate-Do (meaning way of China Hand or way of Empty Hand) and the techniques they learned formed the basis for a new martial art. Correct!
    On April 11, 1955, General Choi, then a general in the South Korean army, began to unify and systemize these related martial arts disciplines by giving Taekwondo its name and its beginnings. In 1961, (NO, this was Sept. 1959, 1961 was the Korean Taesoodo Assoc. it had another Gen Choi as the Chair) General Choi became the first President of the Korea Tae Kwon Do Association, and until his death in 2002, he worked tirelessly and selflessly in the promotion of Taekwondo and in the scientific advancement of Taekwondo techniques. True

    It is an unfortunate reality that martial arts are often attributed to a single person or claimed by a particular nation. This usually results from the selfishness of individuals or the nationalism of governments, with something to gain by claiming that they practice the original or pure form of a particular martial art. In particular, dictatorships are prone to these types of claims. EXACTLY! However, teachers of Taekwondo and other martial arts need to do their part to correct these misnomers by teaching their students the history of their particular style of martial arts. It is important that students be taught the truth about the fundamentals of the martial arts that they study, in order to get the most out of their training. It helps no one if instructors try to make martial arts the product of one nation or try to imbue martial arts with mythological backgrounds and lineages of thousands of years. Noble IMHO

    The following highlights the history of martial arts on the Korean Peninsula:
    I don't care about Korea's past. Yes it has a long & proud history that contained to some extent organized systems of fighting & protection, usually found mostly in the military. So lets concede this generic statement & focus on 1944 onward.

    1945: Korea is liberated from the Japanese. Quite a few Koreans (e.g. Choi Hong Hi, Ro Byong Jik, Lee Won Kook and more), (Chun Sang Sup, Yoon Byung In, Dr. Yoon, Ki Whang Kim in Japan & Hwang Kee in Manchurria, 8 total, 7 had impact in Korea) who practiced Karate in Japan, brought their martial arts training back to Korea after World War II.

    In 1945, the first organization to teach martial arts in Korea, Cho Sun (Korean) Yeon Moo Kwan, which was to influence Taekwondo, was formed. Judo, Karate-Do, Gom-Do (swordsmanship), Kwon Bop (Chuan-Fa in Chinese and Kenpo in Japanese) were taught.
    I think Ro Byung Jik opened his karate school at an Archery school in what is now NK on March 11, 1944. Also Lee Won Kuk opened the CDK for the 1st time in Sept. of 1944, which led to stories/rumors of him being a Japanese sympathizer. But he was forced to close, re-opening after liberation occurred (Aug. 15, 1945, when Japan surrendered)

    1945 to 1955: Taekwondo Kwans (associations) were formed: Chun Do Kwan, Ji Do Kwan, Moo Duk Kwan, Oh Do Kwan, Chang Chung Kwan, Kang Duk Won and Song Moo Kwan. The name Taekwondo was created on April 11, 1955. For ten years, however, Taekwondo was also called Gong Soo Do (meaning empty hand), Tang Soo Doo (meaning Chinese hand) and Soo Bak Do (meaning fighting hand).
    The TKD name was created at the end of 1954, probably proposed at the Dec. 44 meeting & likely approved with Pres. Rhee's calligraphy on 11th April 55.
    TKD was called TKD from 1954 onward at the ODK & by some CDK members loyal to Gen Choi.

    This should be Sept 1959 - 1961: The Korea Tae Kwon Do Association was founded, recognizing the nine Kwans. It then changed it name on September 16, 1961 to the Korea Tae Soo Do Association and then changed back to the Korea Tae Kwon Do Association on August 5, 1965.

    1962: On June 20, the Korea Athletic Union recognized Taekwondo as one of its national competitions.

    1964: On September 3, Taekwondo was officially recognized by the Korean Athletic Union as a national event with seven weight categories.

    1966: The International Taekwondo Federation was founded.

    1971: The International Taekwondo Federation reached 67 countries.

    1972: The Kukkiwon was founded.

    1973: On May 28, the World Taekwondo Federation was founded. The First World Taekwondo championship at the Kukkiwon was held. By then, Taekwondo was being practiced in 108 countries and 200 instructors were teaching in schools around the world.
    The WTF had 19 nations at the WCs & formed the WTF with I think 7 countries then

    1980: The International Taekwondo Federation introduces Taekwondo to Poland, the former Soviet Union and North Korea.
    Sept of 1980 was when TKD was introduced to NK. The USSR came later, maybe 1985/6 & Poland was much earlier. Yugoslavia was the 1st communist country I think & that was 1968. Since SK was locked in a struggle with communism, NK, backed by the USSR & Red China, they labeled Choi a communist sympathizer for his outreach to communist countries. But later the WTF followed him into those same nations & even paid for them to come to the 3rd WCs to build a following for their Olympic goals. Once he went to NK he was called a traitor, even though he eventually was nominated for the Nobel Prize for Peace by Canada, his adopted homeland!


    1994: Taekwondo becomes an official Olympic event. Sept 3rd, 1994

    The growth of Taekwondo around the world from 1955 until now has been astronomical. As a result, in 1994 Taekwondo was recognized by the International Olympic Committee as an official Olympic event and in 2000 it debuted as a medal sport at the Sydney Olympic Games. The true Grandmasters of Taekwondo around the world deserve wide recognition for their untiring efforts in the promotion of Taekwondo, and credit for the tremendous success and acceptance Taekwondo has received.

    However, Olympic fame is not Taekwondo's primary purpose. Perhaps traditional original Taekwondo may be better for the future.
    Perhaps, but I didn't write this!
     
  5. TKDstudent

    TKDstudent Valued Member

    1945: Korea is liberated from the Japanese. Quite a few Koreans (e.g. Choi Hong Hi, Ro Byong Jik, Lee Won Kook and more), (Chun Sang Sup, Yoon Byung In, Dr. Yoon, Ki Whang Kim in Japan & Hwang Kee in Manchurria, 8 total, 7 had impact in Korea) who practiced Karate in Japan, brought their martial arts training back to Korea after World War II.

    In 1945, the first organization to teach martial arts in Korea, Cho Sun (Korean) Yeon Moo Kwan, which was to influence Taekwondo, was formed. Judo, Karate-Do, Gom-Do (swordsmanship), Kwon Bop (Chuan-Fa in Chinese and Kenpo in Japanese) were taught.
    I think Ro Byung Jik opened his karate school at an Archery school in what is now NK on March 11, 1944. Also Lee Won Kuk opened the CDK for the 1st time in Sept. of 1944, which led to stories/rumors of him being a Japanese sympathizer. But he was forced to close, re-opening after liberation occurred (Aug. 15, 1945, when Japan surrendered)

    1945 to 1955: Taekwondo Kwans (associations) were formed: Chun Do Kwan, Ji Do Kwan, Moo Duk Kwan, Oh Do Kwan, Chang Chung Kwan, Kang Duk Won and Song Moo Kwan. The name Taekwondo was created on April 11, 1955. For ten years, however, Taekwondo was also called Gong Soo Do (meaning empty hand), Tang Soo Doo (meaning Chinese hand) and Soo Bak Do (meaning fighting hand).
    The TKD name was created at the end of 1954, probably proposed at the Dec. 54 meeting & likely approved with Pres. Rhee's calligraphy on 11th April 55.
    TKD was called TKD from 1954 onward at the ODK & by some CDK members loyal to Gen Choi.

    1955 Hwa Rang Tul & Chung Mu Tul completed
    1956 Ul Ji Tul completed
    1957 GM Son Duk Sung & Gen Choi form a TKD Assoc of Korea, with Choi as VP, Son as Secty Genl & a politician as president
    1959 Gen. Choi leads the 1st TKD Demo team abroad to Vietnam & Taiwan, excluding GM Son, a civilian
    1959 Gen. Choi write the 1st book on TKD, this book includes the 1st 4 Korean Tuls (patterns) HwaRang, ChungMu, UlJi & SamIl

    1961: Gae Baek Tul completed
    This should be Sept 1959 - 1961: The Korea Tae Kwon Do Association was founded, recognizing the nine Kwans. It then changed it name on September 16, 1961 to the Korea Tae Soo Do Association and then changed back to the Korea Tae Kwon Do Association on August 5, 1965.
    1962 Lt. Col. Woo Jong Lim hosts 1st ever TKD Tournament (Master Woo Jong Lim who eventually be promoted to general)
    1962: On June 20, the Korea Athletic Union recognized Taekwondo as one of its national competitions.
    1962: In the Fall of 62 Gen Choi is sent to Malaysia as the 1st Korean Ambassador to that nation. While there he introduces TKD there as well. His 1st student was promoted to 9th Dan by the ITF-NK.
    1962: In December Nam Tae Hi, who would later rise to Colonel in the ROK Army leads the 1st batch of ROK TKD Military instructors to Vietnam to teach TKD there. He stays a little more than a year. By the end of the war almost 700 TKD instructors were dispatched there!


    1963: In the spring of 63 Gen. Choi sends for Sgt-Major Kim Bok Man to assist him with TKD & they complete the foundations for the 1st English book on TKD & finalize 20 Tuls.
    1963 Gen. Choi with the help of Sgt-Major Kim & Woo Jae Lim establish the Malaysian & Singapore TKD Associations
    1964: On September 3, Taekwondo was officially recognized by the Korean Athletic Union as a national event with seven weight categories.
    1965: Gen Choi, recently returned form his diplomatic assignment as Ambassador to Malaysia is elected 3rd pres of the Korean Taesooso Assoc. in January. Gen Choi is sussessful in changing the name to TKD in August. Gen Choi authors 1st English book on TKD & leads a Kukki TKD Goodwill tour around the world, sponsored by the SK Govt, where he distrubutes his book & lays the foundation for spreading his Art.
    1966: The International Taekwondo Federation was founded. (With 9 countries, many recruited on the previous years world tour)
    1965-67: The Palgwe forms are introduced
    1971: The International Taekwondo Federation reached 67 countries.
    1972: Gen. Choi authors perhaps the most comprehensive book on MAs at the time, which includes his 24 Tuls & he enters a life of exile to escape political oppression at the height of the Park dictatorial regime
    1972: The Kukkiwon was founded.
    1972-3 The Taeguek Poomsae are introduced, as they included input from the Jidokwan & Moodukkwan
    1973: On May 28, the World Taekwondo Federation was founded. The First World Taekwondo championship at the Kukkiwon was held. By then, Taekwondo was being practiced in 108 countries and 200 instructors were teaching in schools around the world.
    The WTF had 19 nations at the WCs & formed the WTF with I think 7 countries then

    1980: The International Taekwondo Federation introduces Taekwondo to Poland, the former Soviet Union and North Korea.
    Sept of 1980 was when TKD was introduced to NK. The USSR came later, maybe 1985/6 & Poland was much earlier. Yugoslavia was the 1st communist country I think & that was 1968. Since SK was locked in a struggle with communism, NK, backed by the USSR & Red China, they labeled Choi a communist sympathizer for his outreach to communist countries. But later the WTF followed him into those same nations & even paid for them to come to the 3rd WCs to build a following for their Olympic goals. Once he went to NK he was called a traitor, even though he eventually was nominated for the Nobel Prize for Peace by Canada, his adopted homeland!
    1982 April 20 The ITF & WTF sign an agreement to merge under the name of the WTF. The signatories were the respective Secretary Generals. This would allow the ITF into the Asian & Olympic Games, but was never implemented
    1983: The 1st edition of the 15 Volume Encyclopedia is finished & printed in 1985, delayed by pressure from the KCIA, the book contains the new pattern Juche Tul, which replaced Kodang
    1988: TKD debutes as 1 time demonstration sport at the Summer Olympics hosted in Seoul, Korea
    1992: TKD reappears as an unprecedented demonstration sport for a 2nd time, after 1 day exhibition sport proposal is scrapped in favor of the return as an demonstration sport in Spain
    1994: Taekwondo becomes an official Olympic event. Sept 3rd, 1994
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2012
  6. StuartA

    StuartA Guardian of real TKD :-)

    This should be 'stickied' IMO!

    Stuart
     
  7. Aegis

    Aegis River Guardian Admin Supporter

    Done.

    Without doubt the best and most honest history of TKD I've ever seen. I couldn't believe it when I looked around during the Olympics and saw references to TKD being a 2,000 year old martial art on various 2012 pages and also (strongly implied, anyway) on Wikipedia. Truly one of the problems of popular beliefs that lack even a shred of evidence...
     
  8. Asterix187

    Asterix187 Valued Member

    Even the commentator was saying its a 2000 year old martial art.
     
  9. Razgriz

    Razgriz Jeja

    I think this is in a sense to mystify it... when its modernness should be one of its selling points.

    Raz
     
  10. TKDstudent

    TKDstudent Valued Member

    Yes & no!
    To say it is modern, opens up the can containing all those Japanese karate worms. Koreans hate the Japanese due to the brutal occupation period where countless Koreans suffered terribly, even dying. Many Koreans think that cultural influences came to Japan, from China via Korea, as Korea is in between the 2 locations!
    The KTA, WTF & KKW have basically thrown their leaders under the bus, as they cling to the 2,000 year old myth! There is no doubt that korea had MAs in a time long past. However the connection to physical techniques are simply not there! They are connected to the karate that was taught in Japan, plain & simple.
    The different styles of TKD took different paths of development away from their common roots, which resulted in 2 new Korean martial activities, a KMA & a Korean Martial sport.
     
  11. Razgriz

    Razgriz Jeja

    Thanks dude, good to see your around ^_^
     

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