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  #16  
Old 28-Mar-2016, 04:15 PM
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Knee Rider Knee Rider is offline
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I think the replies overall and frodocious' in particular illustrate that A) overtraining is cumulative B) training loads that causecit can vary from person to person and C) can be based on a number if external factors outside of the training itself such as work, mental and emotional health, nutrition, sleep etc

My advice would be to eat, stay hydrated, sleep and most importantly to listen to your body. If you start to feel run down then dial it back and look at your rest and nutrition.

Stay healthy!
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  #17  
Old 28-Mar-2016, 08:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Knee Rider View Post
I think the replies overall and frodocious' in particular illustrate that A) overtraining is cumulative B) training loads that causecit can vary from person to person and C) can be based on a number if external factors outside of the training itself such as work, mental and emotional health, nutrition, sleep etc

My advice would be to eat, stay hydrated, sleep and most importantly to listen to your body. If you start to feel run down then dial it back and look at your rest and nutrition.

Stay healthy!
My last degree course in sport psychology, only focused on athletes. The only thing I took from it - that I thought was of any use - was basically what you just said; plus something about praise.

If you tell someone your gifted or you've got good genetics limb length/ ratios their performance will decrease gradually over time. If you tell them your training hard today or that's enough. Theire performance will usually increase. I can't remember the researcher or studies. Dweck rings a bell I'll have a google.

Also I did an essay on Jessica Ennis and her coach and he basically said the same things in 'folk psychology/common sense psychology' language; in a article or video I watched on the internet.
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Last edited by flaming; 28-Mar-2016 at 08:50 PM.
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  #18  
Old 28-Mar-2016, 09:31 PM
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Van Zandt Van Zandt is offline
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Originally Posted by Frodocious View Post
At the moment this^ is very much me. I have a lot of stress in my life at the moment, with work and personal issues. It's not so much overtraining, as it is under-recovering. I'm not sleeping at all well, so I have no energy to train. I can manage some weights and short conditioning sets, but cannot even think about doing a long cardio session during the week. I'm too tired.
What would you define as a "long cardio session"?

I often stress* the importance of building an aerobic base because of the dividends it pays in terms of increasing maximal strength potential and rate of recovery. But it also promotes better sleep and I know you want to build strength because of your back issues, but honestly in your situation I'd recommend cutting right back to 1 or 2 posterior strength exercises at most (e.g. pull-up, hyperextension) and 15-20 minutes of walking, 4-5 times a week. Short, mild sessions, done often, will let you make progress (albeit slow progress) while giving your body a chance to recover properly. I'd also suggest seeing your doctor - the symptoms of overtraining can be caused by acute or chronic illness.

* = pun not intended.
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  #19  
Old 29-Mar-2016, 11:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Van Zandt View Post
What would you define as a "long cardio session"?

I often stress* the importance of building an aerobic base because of the dividends it pays in terms of increasing maximal strength potential and rate of recovery. But it also promotes better sleep and I know you want to build strength because of your back issues, but honestly in your situation I'd recommend cutting right back to 1 or 2 posterior strength exercises at most (e.g. pull-up, hyperextension) and 15-20 minutes of walking, 4-5 times a week. Short, mild sessions, done often, will let you make progress (albeit slow progress) while giving your body a chance to recover properly. I'd also suggest seeing your doctor - the symptoms of overtraining can be caused by acute or chronic illness.

* = pun not intended.
For me, a long cardio session is a 45(ish) min easy run. At the moment, I know what it causing my stress and its not something I can change for the time being. The main issue I have is lack of sleep, which is partially due to stress and partially due to my lack of willpower to put the light out early enough.
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  #20  
Old 04-Apr-2016, 05:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Frodocious View Post
For me, a long cardio session is a 45(ish) min easy run. At the moment, I know what it causing my stress and its not something I can change for the time being. The main issue I have is lack of sleep, which is partially due to stress and partially due to my lack of willpower to put the light out early enough.
Could you try some kb goblet walking up and down your stairs. Unless you have a bungalow. Doing a Sumo kb dl at the top.

Warrior really sorts the hips and I find long walks if you have time. Or if you don't have time walk faster. walking especcially uphill is an inefficient method of locomotion because it doesn't use the stretch rsponse. That's why I believe it looks daft on the olympics.
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  #21  
Old 22-Jun-2016, 03:50 PM
newgymer1981 newgymer1981 is offline
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I know this thread is a few months old, however, I can tell you that I was over-training and recently got a fluke ankle injury. Here's what I was doing per week

2 salsa/dance classes (total 1.5 hours)
2 boot camp classes (total 2 hours)
1 cardio kickboxing class (total 1 hour)
2 Muay Thai classes (total 2 hours - 50% technique/50% cardio)
2 hours volleyball (total 2 hours)
2 hours yoga (total 2 hours).

I was doing this for about 6 months. Luck finally caught up with me.
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  #22  
Old 20-Jul-2016, 08:14 PM
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Gunner Gunner is offline
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Everyone is different. One person's routine might be right for them and overtraining for someone else. One of the best indicators of overtraining is loss of interest. Add to that tiredness and general fatigue. If that sounds like you, it's time to change the routine for awhile.
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