What is this strike called?

Discussion in 'General Martial Arts Discussion' started by nicosp, Mar 15, 2019.

  1. nicosp

    nicosp New Member

    Hi forum

    I was wondering if this stike has a name and in what martial arts it is used:
     
    Grond likes this.
  2. dbl0

    dbl0 Member

    In my practice it would be used with a clenched fist and is just referred to as a backfist, although that would just be one of several variations of using the back of the fist to strike with.
    The way in which you have used it we would tend to do so from the leading hand, dropping the hand down then using the back fist strike in a very similar way as you have done.

    If you are striking with the wrist butt rather than the back of the hand then we would call that Cranes Head.
     
  3. Pretty In Pink

    Pretty In Pink Valued Member MAP 2017 Gold Award

    Clothsline. Basically Rutten has a few videos on it.
     
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  4. Smitfire

    Smitfire Cactus Schlong

    Stylistically it could be a little bit like a Russian hook or casting punch?
     
  5. Thomas

    Thomas Combat Hapkido/Taekwondo

    If you are striking with the wrist/neck of the forearm, we'd call is an "oxjaw". I've never thrown an oxjaw in that way though.

    If you are striking with the back of the hand/knuckles, I'd call it an (inverse) back fist.
     
  6. aaradia

    aaradia Choy Li Fut and Yang Tai Chi Chuan Student Moderator Supporter

    Are you hitting with the first knuckle? If so, Sow Choi in Choy Li Fut. But we would have a bit more bend in the arm to protect the elbow.
     
  7. GoldShifter

    GoldShifter The MachineGun Roundhouse

    We call it a "ridgehand" in Kajukenbo if you are striking with with kind of the thumb side of the hand. Think a "karate chop" instead of striking with the pinky section of your hand, you're swinging and hitting with the thumb side.

    If it's knuckles, we call it a roundhouse punch.
     
  8. Grond

    Grond Valued Member

    That is an overhand strike in boxing. See how your hand drops first It's not an "orthodox" boxing strike, but still very powerful. Please see below. There are two great videos in there.

    How To: Over-Hand Right
     

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