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  #76  
Old 17-Oct-2016, 12:03 AM
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Hapuka Hapuka is offline
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Location: Aotearoa/New Zealand
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Originally Posted by Hapuka View Post

Unfortunately I could not film the grading, Mau Rakau in New Zealand is still not fully understood nor accepted by the public and our organization has been getting into trouble because of individuals posting videos on facebook and youtube.
In the future I will see if I can film myself at the next grading (with permission) and I will share the footage privately with those that have shown interest in this blog over the years. I will also make a pre-grading video too before I go for my next rank. I personally feel that its important to share what Mau Rakau is to ensure its survival with the rest of the martial arts community, as very few people know about it.
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  #77  
Old 21-Oct-2016, 03:44 AM
uepohatu uepohatu is offline
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Originally Posted by Hapuka View Post
In the future I will see if I can film myself at the next grading (with permission) and I will share the footage privately with those that have shown interest in this blog over the years. I will also make a pre-grading video too before I go for my next rank. I personally feel that its important to share what Mau Rakau is to ensure its survival with the rest of the martial arts community, as very few people know about it.
Kia ora e hoa, ka mau te wehi! He aha te ra o to whakamatautau? Hoani Waititi?
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  #78  
Old 22-Oct-2016, 12:03 AM
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Mangosteen Mangosteen is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hapuka View Post
In the future I will see if I can film myself at the next grading (with permission) and I will share the footage privately with those that have shown interest in this blog over the years. I will also make a pre-grading video too before I go for my next rank. I personally feel that its important to share what Mau Rakau is to ensure its survival with the rest of the martial arts community, as very few people know about it.
I'd love to see it.
Came back on MAP for the first time in months just to check on your blog!
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  #79  
Old 22-Oct-2016, 06:53 AM
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Hapuka Hapuka is offline
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Kia ora e hoa, ka mau te wehi! He aha te ra o to whakamatautau? Hoani Waititi?
Kia Ora Uepohatu. Nga mihi for your kind words. I think I understand your question but I can't respond properly in Te Reo Maori (still learning)

The grading was held at Rakautatahi Marae and I graded for my pou tahi (level 1) rank. The highest rank achieved at the grading was pou wha (level 4) - which was achieved by an individual from the wellington peka.

Unfortunately I do not have any footage from that grading but I will try to film at the next grading.
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  #80  
Old 21-Nov-2016, 06:24 AM
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Hapuka Hapuka is offline
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Hi folks, its been a while since I last updated. Training has been going well and I'm current learning what I need to know for the next big grading next year (or the year after depending on how fast I learn). I also found out tonight that I received an excellence at the grading (its been like 20 years since I got one of those). Also tonight I got to experience what I was like to spar against someone with a Patu. The Patu is very much an extension of the fist, and the techniques utilized with the Patu can involve kicking, using knees, elbow strikes and punches. My own ancestor, Wiremu Karaweko (chief of Kati Irakehu) was well re-known for his fighting abilities, the Patu being his weapon of choice. It was very humbling to spar with my Kaiako (tutor) and experience getting clipped with a training Patu first hand (lol). Unfortunately I won't be learning how to spar with a Patu until I've passed 3 more levels.
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  #81  
Old 17-Feb-2017, 04:25 AM
Devon Devon is offline
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So I was talking to my kaiako (teacher) tonight and I asked him why Mau Rakau is not as public as say many other martial arts like Karate, Taekwon-do or Muay Thai. He told me that Mau Rakau was illegal at one point to practice publicly as recent as 30 years ago. Naturally I was horrified, as I believe that Mau Rakau has allot to offer not only for Maori but also for Pakeha (ethnically non Maori). Criticism for the practice of Mau Rakau has not come from the martial arts community at large but from the government and people who don't practice martial arts in general. This is also the reason why it remains relatively secretive today, my kaiako's reasoning is because the wider New Zealand public are not ready to receive it. People have been arrested as recently as up to 5 years ago for teaching Mau Rakau.
For what it's worth, I became interested in Mau Rakau about 40 years ago and did some training with a good club in Hastings (Hawkes Bay) maybe 35 years back - I think the instructor's name was Steve Heperi. I know Mita Mohi was running his taiaha courses on Mokoia Island then as well; Irirangi Tiakiawa was also teaching at that time. Later on (1990s) I did a bit of training with Hirini Reedy in Wellington. Never heard of teaching the art being illegal (?!) but I've heard of a few people over the years being arrested for attacking others with a taiaha.

The big change was when Pita Sharples started running truly public classes and developed a more structured curriculum, maybe in the late '80s (?)
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  #82  
Old 19-Apr-2017, 09:07 AM
HeWhanoke HeWhanoke is offline
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Smile Ngā mihi ki a koe!

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Originally Posted by Hapuka View Post
So grading has come and gone and me and my older sister passed. Everyone from my group that graded, passed. Which is huge considering that 2/3 thirds of the people that attempted to grade did not pass. I wasn't expecting to pass either.
Kia ora Hapuka,

Ko Hikurangi te maunga
Ko Waiapu te awa
Ko Ngāti Porou te iwi

I stumbled across your blog totally by accident and what an awesome insight into starting mau rakau from the perspective of a pia (beginner). I myself have just started my journey into Mau Rakau. I am hoping to be graded at the end of the year with the Porirua Rōpu.

I live in Queenstown (although I am originally from the East Coast), and I have the unbelieveable fortune of living just down the street from a Pou-ono kairakau. Even better is that she is trained in Te Whare Taua o Aotearoa style (Pita Sharples) which includes aspects of the East Coast style (Arapeta Awatere).

Long story short is that she has agreed to train a rag tag bunch of us and to say Im hooked is a gross understatement. We catch up weekly and its probably the highlight of my week.

So I would just like to say, that I really enjoy your blog and stepping through your early journey including your first grading (which I am yet to experience). Ngā mihi nui ki a koe me tō tuakana hoki. Huge congrats to you and your older sister too. Well done on passing your grading.

Hope you keep updating your blog as Id love to hear how your journey progresses.

Mā te wā (bye for now)
He Whanoke
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  #83  
Old 19-Apr-2017, 08:32 PM
uepohatu uepohatu is offline
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Tena koe He Whanoke,

No Te Tairawhiti au. Mangahanea me Raahui o Kahu toku Marae.
Ko Kaiwai taku ignoa whanau.

Awesome to see more people picking up the rakau. Train hard and grade easy

Every ropu/kaiako is different, but we're told trainings should only be used to correct mistakes - 80% of your training should be in your own time.

This has stuck me since I started this journey. Don't leave your rakau in the corner until the next training, pick one up every day. Even if you're not training the mahi, get used to moving it around in different ways.

Train your mahi religiously, learn why you do each movement, research what each word means, so you know and understand it - this will only benefit you later down the track.

How well do you know the mahi? Different kaiako will sometimes put you on the spot using a new way of teaching. Know your mahi. Using Ahei as an example - do you know it in order, mixed up, backwards, every second in order etc. Strive to be the best you can be for the level you're grading.

Kia kaha
Kia maia
Kia manawanui

Uepohatu

Last edited by uepohatu; 20-Apr-2017 at 01:10 AM.
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