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  #16  
Old 25-Feb-2011, 06:56 AM
invisi invisi is offline
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I respect that. I watched a shaolin monk do something with that ability. There is a pugilist club in epsom that teaches students hard qikong, this too i see.

Peace.

tapos na, kuya.
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  #17  
Old 25-Feb-2011, 10:18 PM
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frownland frownland is offline
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Can anyone give examples from this article of the PRC's view on qigong, and how that differs from other perspectives? thanks
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  #18  
Old 07-Mar-2011, 08:05 AM
frostty frostty is offline
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i would like to ask if there are side effects of breathing practising if the practise was not right??
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  #19  
Old 09-Apr-2011, 05:19 PM
kevinfoster kevinfoster is offline
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Breathing incorrect

Yes there can be difficulties in breathing excercises are done incorrect. I advise the guidance of an experienced master if you can find one. Good luck!
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  #20  
Old 10-Apr-2011, 05:55 AM
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47MartialMan 47MartialMan is offline
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Originally Posted by invisi View Post
I respect that. I watched a shaolin monk do something with that ability. There is a pugilist club in epsom that teaches students hard qikong, this too i see.

Peace.

tapos na, kuya.
There aren't any true Shaolin monk nowadays. There hadn't been any true Shaolin monks for centuries
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  #21  
Old 11-Apr-2011, 06:32 PM
kevinfoster kevinfoster is offline
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There aren't any true Shaolin monk nowadays. There hadn't been any true Shaolin monks for centuries
There are Shaolin monks that still live in the temple and practice and study buddhism There are no more true warrior monks China is no longer at war with the Ching Dynasty. There is no longer a purpose for the training of warrior monks. Thank you for your thoughts and ideas. With Peace and Honor
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  #22  
Old 11-Apr-2011, 10:13 PM
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47MartialMan 47MartialMan is offline
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Originally Posted by kevinfoster View Post
There are Shaolin monks that still live in the temple and practice and study buddhism There are no more true warrior monks China is no longer at war with the Ching Dynasty. There is no longer a purpose for the training of warrior monks. Thank you for your thoughts and ideas. With Peace and Honor
Nope. The monks there nowadays are wushu people/locals portraying a role for the Gov Tourism.

The PROC will never succumb to freedom of religion per individuality likewise Chen Buddhism.

Do I believe or know there are Chen Buddhist Monks?
Yes. But not at Shaolin
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  #23  
Old 14-Apr-2011, 03:41 AM
kevinfoster kevinfoster is offline
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Originally Posted by 47MartialMan View Post
Nope. The monks there nowadays are wushu people/locals portraying a role for the Gov Tourism.

The PROC will never succumb to freedom of religion per individuality likewise Chen Buddhism.

Do I believe or know there are Chen Buddhist Monks?
Yes. But not at Shaolin
Yes your are very true in your statements about wushu and Shaolin and I also agree with you after the temple was burned down the knowledge was dispersed and hidden, If one searches for the knowledge hard enough in the proper circles it can be found intact, taught, and practiced
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  #24  
Old 15-Apr-2011, 12:43 AM
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Originally Posted by kevinfoster View Post
Yes your are very true in your statements about wushu and Shaolin and I also agree with you after the temple was burned down the knowledge was dispersed and hidden, If one searches for the knowledge hard enough in the proper circles it can be found intact, taught, and practiced
With utmost respect-

This is not always the case.

Sometimes knowledge or set instruction of a particular thing is lost.

Take cooking. I can't find a dish once made by my mother, taught to her by hers, and taught to her by hers, and so forth.

What I am trying to state, sometimes time and situation of events take a toll on what can be further passed.

After the PROC take over, many good instructors fled China and either went into another country or took their "knowledge" to the grave.

Also, in short, Shaolin was built for and its authentic inhabitants, was about the study of Chen/Chan
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  #25  
Old 29-Apr-2011, 05:03 PM
kevinfoster kevinfoster is offline
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Originally Posted by 47MartialMan View Post
With utmost respect-

This is not always the case.

Sometimes knowledge or set instruction of a particular thing is lost.

Take cooking. I can't find a dish once made by my mother, taught to her by hers, and taught to her by hers, and so forth.

What I am trying to state, sometimes time and situation of events take a toll on what can be further passed.

After the PROC take over, many good instructors fled China and either went into another country or took their "knowledge" to the grave.

Also, in short, Shaolin was built for and its authentic inhabitants, was about the study of Chen/Chan
I understand your position I am part of a research team tracing back the roots of Shaolin to where it lead all the way to present day here is some of our research. Hope this helps on our discussion.

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QKfsMjZ7r5U"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QKfsMjZ7r5U[/ame]

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XBGuKwxpuaM"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XBGuKwxpuaM[/ame]

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x1tWkhRXLnA"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x1tWkhRXLnA[/ame]

http://home.vtmuseum.org/genealogy/index.php
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  #26  
Old 29-Apr-2011, 05:25 PM
kevinfoster kevinfoster is offline
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Originally Posted by 47MartialMan View Post
[COLOR="Blue"][U]lso, in short, Shaolin was built for and its authentic inhabitants, was about the study of Chen/Chan
With upmost respect also Sir

Some what true shaolin was built as a moastary at that time there was quite a bit of doaist and confuscious thought in the temple until bodhidarma came form India and brought buddhism to the temple. Then Chan was created which is some what of a taoism and buddhism fusion. Which is one of the treasures os Shaolin

http://home.vtmuseum.org/articles/meng/3treasures.php

May Peace and Honor Remain with you
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  #27  
Old 29-Apr-2011, 11:07 PM
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47MartialMan 47MartialMan is offline
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With upmost respect also Sir

Some what true shaolin was built as a moastary at that time there was quite a bit of doaist and confuscious thought in the temple until bodhidarma came form India and brought buddhism to the temple. Then Chan was created which is some what of a taoism and buddhism fusion. Which is one of the treasures os Shaolin

http://home.vtmuseum.org/articles/meng/3treasures.php

May Peace and Honor Remain with you
You are slightly incorrect.

There was never a Taoist and Confucius thought at Shaolin. Also the study of Chen/Chan was already there before Bodhidarma went there. (Because the temple had long been built and the monks were already poorly practicing Chan before his arrival.) Although some scholars accredit Bodhidarma for
Chen/Chan, is not a fusion of Taoist and Confucious, as it is more likely a blend of Mahayana Buddhism which is influenced by Taoism. It is more likely, since Bodhidarma arrived at the temple, clearly showing that the temple and Chan already was present before his arrival. It is more likely to accredit Bodhidarma with motivating and exercising the monks who were there before him.

It was never clear and somewhat exaggerated, that Bodhidarma ever had shown the monks Chuan Fa or any fighting method. Some scholars believe, at a era of turmoil, rebel forces had occupied religious temples for sanctuary, thus the Imperial government would never trample onto holy ground. These rebels themselves became monks, incognito, which in turn protected their haven and the occupants. (Which would paint the sense why a monk or monk-rebel, would become a traitor and destroy the temples from within.)

May Peace and Honor Remain with you
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  #28  
Old 30-Apr-2011, 02:53 AM
kevinfoster kevinfoster is offline
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Thank you for your thoughts and ideas kind sir I have learned from you.
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  #29  
Old 30-Apr-2011, 03:06 AM
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Thank you for your thoughts and ideas kind sir I have learned from you.
I see you have one of my most favorite sites.

http://home.vtmuseum.org/information/location.php

I have a few students near this area. I am about to take a pilgrimage to visit
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  #30  
Old 30-Apr-2011, 03:10 AM
kevinfoster kevinfoster is offline
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At this point, Da Mo was nearing the location of the Shaolin Temple. The Shaolin monks had heard of his approach and were gathered to meet him. When Da Mo arrived, the Shaolin monks greeted him and invited him to come stay at the temple. Da Mo did not reply but he went to a cave on a mountain behind the Shaolin Temple, sat down, and began meditating. In front of the Shaolin Temple, there are five mountains: Bell Mountain, Drum Mountain, Sword Mountain, Stamp Mountain and Flag Mountain. These mountains are named after the objects which their shape resembles. Behind the Shaolin Temple there are five "Breast Mountains" which are shaped like breasts. The cave in which Da Mo chose to meditate was on one of the Breast Mountains.

Da Mo sat facing a wall in the cave and meditated for nine years. During these nine years, Shen Guang stayed outside Da Mo's cave and acted as a bodyguard for Da Mo, ensuring that no harm came to Da Mo. Periodically Shen Guang would ask Da Mo to teach him, but Da Mo never responded to Shen Guang's requests. During these nine years the Shaolin monks would also periodically invite Da Mo to come down to the Temple, where he would be much more comfortable, but Da Mo never responded. After some time, Da Mo's concentration became so intense that his image was engraved into the stone of the wall before him.

Towards the end of the nine years, the Shaolin monks decided that they must do something more for Da Mo and so they made a special room for him. They called this room the Da Mo Ting. When this room was completed at the end of the nine years, the Shaolin monks invited Da Mo to come stay in the room. Da Mo did not respond but he stood up, walked down to the room, sat down, and immediately began meditating. Shen Guang followed Da Mo to the Shaolin temple and stood guard outside Da Mo's room. Da Mo meditated in his room for another four years. Shen Guang would occasionally ask Da Mo to teach him, but Da Mo never responded.

At the end of the four-year period Shen Guang had been following Da Mo for thirteen years, but Da Mo had never said anything to Shen Guang. It was winter when the four-year period was ending and Shen Guang was standing in the snow outside the window to Da Mo's room. He was cold and became very angry. He picked up a large block of snow and ice and hurled it into Da Mo's room. The snow and ice made a loud noise as it broke inside Da Mo's room. This noise awoke Da Mo from his meditation and he looked at Shen Guang. In anger and frustration Shen Guang demanded to know when Da Mo would teach him.

Da Mo responded that he would teach Shen Guang when red snow fell from the sky.
Hearing this, something inside Shen Guang's heart changed and he took the sword he carried from his belt and cut off his left arm. He held the severed arm above his head and whirled it around. The blood from the arm froze in the cold air and fell like red snow. Seeing this, Da Mo agreed to teach Shen Guang.

Da Mo took a monk's spade and went with Shen Guang to the Drum Mountain in front of Shaolin Temple. The Drum Mountain is so called because it is very flat on top. Da Mo's unspoken message to Shen Guang was that Shen Guang should flatten his heart, just like the surface of the Drum Mountain. On this Drum Mountain Da Mo dug a well. The water of this well was bitter. Da Mo then left Shen Guang on the Drum Mountain. For an entire year, Shen Guang used the bitter water of the well to take care of all of his needs. He used it to cook, to clean, to bathe, to do everything. At the end of the first year, Shen Guang went down to Da Mo and again asked Da Mo to teach him. Da Mo returned with Shen Guang to the Drum Mountain and dug a second well. The water of this well was spicy. For an entire year, Shen Guang used the spicy water for all of his needs. At the end of the second year, Shen Guang went back down to Da Mo and asked again to be taught. Da Mo dug a third well on the Drum Mountain. The water of this third well was sour. For the third year, Shen Guang used the sour water for all of his needs. At the end of the third year, Shen Guang returned to Da Mo and agains asked to be taught. Da Mo returned to the Drum Mountain and dug a fourth and final well. The water of this well was sweet. At this point, Shen Guang realized that the four wells represented his life. Like the wells, his life would sometimes be bitter, sometimes sour, sometimes spicy and sometimes sweet. Each of these phases in his life was equally beautiful and necessary, just as each of the four seasons of the year is beautiful and necessary in its own way. Without really saying many words to Shen Guang, Da Mo had taught Shen Guang the most important of lessons in a mind-to-mind, heart-to-heart fashion. This mind-to- mind, heart-to-heart communication is called "action language" and is the foundation of the Chan Buddhism which Da Mo began at the Shaolin Temple.After his realization, Shen Guang was given the name Hui Ke and he became abbot of the Shaolin temple after Da Mo.

To pay respect for the sacrifice which Hui Ke made, disciples and monks of the Shaolin Temple greet each other using only their right hand.

http://www.usashaolintemple.org/chanbuddhism-history/
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