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  #16  
Old 17-Mar-2017, 10:20 AM
bigreddog bigreddog is offline
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Every time you spar someone, have an objective. A specific objective for that round.

Lots of good advice here. Remember you need 3 partners:
1. Beginners who you can work with without risking yourself
2. Peers who push you at the right level
3. Superiors who you can learn from

I'm a big guy and fairly experienced, so I often spar with beginners - I just let them tee off on me to build their confidence, and work on something specific (say relying on head movement for defence) which I wouldn't try with better fighters

Against the guys who are better than me, I look to prevent them exerting their game plan on me. Not winning (its sparring, there is no winner) but if they are looking to work at range, I'll see if I can close them down in a clinch. Or vice versa.
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  #17  
Old 17-Mar-2017, 10:40 AM
KSP08 KSP08 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigreddog View Post

Lots of good advice here. Remember you need 3 partners:
1. Beginners who you can work with without risking yourself
2. Peers who push you at the right level
3. Superiors who you can learn from

.
Good way of thinking about it!
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  #18  
Old 19-Mar-2017, 12:25 AM
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kandi kandi is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigreddog View Post
Every time you spar someone, have an objective. A specific objective for that round.

Lots of good advice here. Remember you need 3 partners:
1. Beginners who you can work with without risking yourself
2. Peers who push you at the right level
3. Superiors who you can learn from

I'm a big guy and fairly experienced, so I often spar with beginners - I just let them tee off on me to build their confidence, and work on something specific (say relying on head movement for defence) which I wouldn't try with better fighters

Against the guys who are better than me, I look to prevent them exerting their game plan on me. Not winning (its sparring, there is no winner) but if they are looking to work at range, I'll see if I can close them down in a clinch. Or vice versa.
That's good! Having one or two things to work on might help "overthinking".

I don't see a thanks button floating around, so
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  #19  
Old 19-Mar-2017, 12:36 AM
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Chadderz Chadderz is offline
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Originally Posted by kandi View Post

I don't see a thanks button floating around, so
They're working on it (allegedly )
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  #20  
Old 19-Mar-2017, 04:24 PM
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Langenschwert Langenschwert is offline
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Another thing that helps is planning ahead of time what you want to work on this time while sparring. Always have a plan. For example, here's what I'm working on most times when I spar:

BKB/Combatives: Landing my right hand more (I'm a lefty who boxes orthodox)

Judo: Ippon Seio Nage (single arm throw). I'm too tall for it to work well, but it's still a pet project of mine. Also O Uchi Gari (major inside reap), since it's good for a lefty like me vs. a righty.

HEMA: Guard breaks: Picking the appropriate attack to launch at a given guard, delivered at the right range. For example, against a low point forward guard (Plow, Posta Breve, Chudan etc), the optimal attack is a downward diagonal cut with the back edge ending in a thrust. Landing it when the opponent knows that is tricky.

So every time I spar, I work on those things. It means I get hit and thrown a lot. but that's OK, because every time I get closer to pulling those things off in a more consistent fashion.
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  #21  
Old 21-Mar-2017, 10:47 AM
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kandi kandi is offline
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This is really stupid and I don't understand it.

I just can't seem to make this "click". Blue belt blues, maybe.

I have a theory that the more I train, the more I realise I have to improve before I can honestly say I have a mastery of the basics (to get to black belt). So daunting
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  #22  
Old 21-Mar-2017, 10:49 AM
KSP08 KSP08 is offline
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Black belts feel that way, too. Martial arts is a never-ending journey. Hang in there- I'm sure you are improving a little each day even if you don't realize it.
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  #23  
Old 21-Mar-2017, 10:54 AM
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Chadderz Chadderz is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kandi View Post
This is really stupid and I don't understand it.

I just can't seem to make this "click". Blue belt blues, maybe.

I have a theory that the more I train, the more I realise I have to improve before I can honestly say I have a mastery of the basics (to get to black belt). So daunting
I know how you feel, I was a blue belt for two years

You'll get there in the end.
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  #24  
Old 21-Mar-2017, 11:05 AM
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kandi kandi is offline
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I know how you feel, I was a blue belt for two years

You'll get there in the end.
You are such a lovely guy! Glad to hear you got through it

I don't think there is an option but to keep going, keep training, but it feels like a long hard slog. I used to think I was above average for my belt, now I'm just treading water. Apologies for the pity party - I'm just trying to work out how to go forward, faster.
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  #25  
Old 21-Mar-2017, 11:20 AM
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Chadderz Chadderz is offline
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Originally Posted by kandi View Post
You are such a lovely guy! Glad to hear you got through it

I don't think there is an option but to keep going, keep training, but it feels like a long hard slog. I used to think I was above average for my belt, now I'm just treading water. Apologies for the pity party - I'm just trying to work out how to go forward, faster.
Did you just assume my genders? j/k

The thing about improving, is its a lot like growing. You don't realise you're doing until BAM! You hit your head on the bunk bed when you sit up in the morning.
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  #26  
Old 21-Mar-2017, 11:53 AM
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kandi kandi is offline
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Did you just assume my genders? j/k
Yes ma'am I did
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  #27  
Old 21-Mar-2017, 12:25 PM
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Chadderz Chadderz is offline
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Yes ma'am I did
I'm actually a dragonkin and identify as such
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  #28  
Old 21-Mar-2017, 06:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Chadderz View Post
Don't chase them and counter them instead? l.
I like this advise.

I tell my students that when they start to struggle go back to the default position, which is behind a good guard.

Work up from there.

Block a few, then try and slip a few and build your confidence from there.

Block a few and throw a jab or front kick back.

Everything though starts behind that good guard and stance, whatever your style.

You said your instructor told you to throw a feint, but if you don't commit to it it'll be seen a mile off.

Remember a feint can hit and a feint has to travel over 50% of the way to its target.

Many throw a feint jab just a couple of inches to try and draw a flinch and it just doesn't work.


it can be done, but it requires a lot of training and the entire body is behind it.

I suggest feinting deeper.

One last thing.

Out at 50, back at 100.

Get those arms and legs back into position quick so you can work behind that good defence.
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