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  #16  
Old 24-Feb-2017, 04:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aikiMac
As an alternative you might like hapkido. In simplistic terms it's TKD + Jap JJ.
Uggggh.... I hate this analogy. Yes, I know it's a pretty good one, but I still hate it!

Hapkido really depends on where you learn it. As an art, it stems from (and has a base in) Aikijujutsu, with an emphasis on circular footwork, joint locks, falling, and so on. In its formative years in Korea, there was a lot of development going on that led to quite a few different 'types' of Hapkido... some with more kicks and punches, some with acrobatic breakfalls, some with lots of weapons, some with patterns and so far. The nice thing about Hapkido is it generally produces students with 'decent' overall skills in self defense and level of force knowledge.

If you plan to study Hapkido for your primary art, I would suggest doing some cross training later with some sort of grappling (one area where I think HKD is a bit weak).

It can be a bit 'hit or miss' depending on where you train though.

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Originally Posted by Rataca100 View Post
I do have another question on TKD, is it taught differently in Korea on average to western countries? (probably not)
I trained in Korea for 4 years, studying Hapkido and Taekwondo.

In my opinion, based on my experience, TKD in Korea tends to focus more exclusively on the art's requirements (like patterns, sparring, and breaking) with little focus on things like 'self defense' and such. It also is very much focused on kids' classes... where many kinds get bussed to the dojang and train for an hour, then another group, and another and so on. It can be tough to find a good 'adult' program (not impossible). And in SOuth Korea, it will most likely be a WTF/Kukkiwon school... the other groups are not represented very well in South Korea.
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  #17  
Old 24-Feb-2017, 10:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Thomas View Post



In my opinion, based on my experience, TKD in Korea tends to focus more exclusively on the art's requirements (like patterns, sparring, and breaking) with little focus on things like 'self defense' and such. It also is very much focused on kids' classes... where many kinds get bussed to the dojang and train for an hour, then another group, and another and so on. It can be tough to find a good 'adult' program (not impossible). And in SOuth Korea, it will most likely be a WTF/Kukkiwon school... the other groups are not represented very well in South Korea.

Good point, i forgot they did that in some asian countries.
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  #18  
Old 19-May-2017, 03:09 PM
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Aren't the majority of TKD groups either ITF or WTF regardless, but end up setting up their own organisations because they want to be in charge, basically, however, they will use reasoning (excuses) such as that they're discontent with how the parent organisation is being run, etc. Personally, i think it's a power thing.
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  #19  
Old 19-May-2017, 05:54 PM
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Originally Posted by LetsGetItOn View Post
Aren't the majority of TKD groups either ITF or WTF regardless, but end up setting up their own organisations because they want to be in charge, basically, however, they will use reasoning (excuses) such as that they're discontent with how the parent organisation is being run, etc. Personally, i think it's a power thing.
I think this can be the case in some examples.

For others, it also has to do with how TKD grew... I know of some schools that were formed early on using the ITF material and then were later pressured to join the WTF (based on world politics in some cases). In some cases, these loyal school would then be told to change to new patterns as the parent federation added/changed them. For some schools... these frequent mandated changes were tiring, especially when some felt that the parent organizations were not giving much to them aside from certificates, but were expecting membership fees, test fees, and other support. I know of some schools that dropped out, kept doing what they had learned as 'traditional' and set up their own federation.
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  #20  
Old 20-May-2017, 09:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LetsGetItOn View Post
Aren't the majority of TKD groups either ITF or WTF regardless, but end up setting up their own organisations because they want to be in charge, basically, however, they will use reasoning (excuses) such as that they're discontent with how the parent organisation is being run, etc. Personally, i think it's a power thing.
I'm sure there as many motives as people, so as organisations grow, it's inevitable that some may have different views, or conflicts may arise and so people leave.

Some doubtless do it for power, but I'm sure many do it for other reasons.

Mitch
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  #21  
Old 20-May-2017, 12:14 PM
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Ben Gash CLF Ben Gash CLF is offline
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I'm sure there as many motives as people, so as organisations grow, it's inevitable that some may have different views, or conflicts may arise and so people leave.

Some doubtless do it for power, but I'm sure many do it for other reasons.

Mitch
Indeed, rather than casting aspersions about people's motives maybe it's more important to ask why those reasons couldn't be facilitated within the parent organisation? Strong leaders encourage leadership in those around them.
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