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  #16  
Old 13-Jan-2017, 02:42 PM
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Thomas Thomas is offline
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As an instructor, I tend to look at belts as "book marks in the curriculum"... they generally tell me how far a student has progressed, what they have studied, and what they should be studying in general. With a quick glance, I can put students on appropriate tasks within a class.

Granted, I tend to be quite flexible and like to mix groups and topics - review for the senior guys and new stuff for the lower ranked guys who can handle it.

In general, I break the color belts into three groups:

Beginners (White, Yellow, Orange) - these students need to be watched closely to make sure they are getting the basics and reviewing the core foundations. Generally I protect them more.

Intermediate (Green, Purple, Blue)- these students tend to have a good foundation and a good hunger to learn more. They are proficient enough to work at a higher level of contact and require less supervision, although generally there is a need to keep an eye on them to make sure they don't exceed what they can handle (and to protect their partners sometimes).They also have to be watched with their partners because at this point some students think they 'know it all' and haven't tempered the knowledge with quite enough experience.

Advanced (brown) - these students usually have a strong foundation and good knowledge of the core foundation. They can be trusted to work with junior and senior students without (intentionally) getting hurt or hurting someone. At this point, some of the training focuses on learning more by learning to teach this (warm ups, supervised instruction of a technique, etc). These students are committed, well trained, work hard, and are expected to be able to start directing some of their own training goals.

Black belt - has demonstrated the core knowledge of the system satisfactorily and now is learning to teach the core curriculum while assisting the instructor. Also, the curriculum shifts now to improving and refining the core material and applying it in smoother and smoother ways.
(We then divide the black belts into 9 levels, but I won't get into that)

As easy as it is to say that a 'belt doesn't mean anything', within the context of a school, they do... on one hand they should give a good indication of where a student is in the curriculum and they should give an indication of how hard you can go with them/what they can handle. By black belt, they should be a pretty good representative of the school in terms of quality of instruction. That said, it is much harder (or sometimes impossible) to compare belts across schools and arts.
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  #17  
Old 13-Jan-2017, 02:54 PM
pecks pecks is offline
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Good post.
That reminds me, we once had a guest instructor. I was paired up with a black belt, and we we doing a basic punch/block drill. The thought came into my mind, that my instructor always tells us to punch straight when doing this (as opposed to punching off-centre, towards where you know the block is coming). So I did, and I hit the black belt straight on the nose. I then had to spend the next two hours training with an extremely annoyed and un-cooperative black belt.
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  #18  
Old 13-Jan-2017, 04:05 PM
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Travess Travess is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas View Post
As an instructor, I tend to look at belts as "book marks in the curriculum"... they generally tell me how far a student has progressed, what they have studied, and what they should be studying in general. With a quick glance, I can put students on appropriate tasks within a class.

Granted, I tend to be quite flexible and like to mix groups and topics - review for the senior guys and new stuff for the lower ranked guys who can handle it.
Exactly - Couldn't have put it any better myself!

Quote:
Originally Posted by pecks View Post
Good post.
That reminds me, we once had a guest instructor. I was paired up with a black belt, and we we doing a basic punch/block drill. The thought came into my mind, that my instructor always tells us to punch straight when doing this (as opposed to punching off-centre, towards where you know the block is coming). So I did, and I hit the black belt straight on the nose. I then had to spend the next two hours training with an extremely annoyed and un-cooperative black belt.
The error, I am sure you already realise, lies completely at the Black Belts feet (or nose, if you'd prefer) not necessarily for his clear error in judgment of the incoming technique, but certainly for his attitude that followed. I personally have more time for a technically flawed black belt, who is more humble and gratious, than I do vice versa.

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  #19  
Old 13-Jan-2017, 04:19 PM
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Latikos Latikos is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pecks View Post
...my instructor always tells us to punch straight when doing this (as opposed to punching off-centre, towards where you know the block is coming).
Same here.
Among the first things we learn and teach is that a hit has to go there, where it's supposed to be. Not to the side or above the head (for example) or whatever.
When we are supposed to hit the nose, that's where we're aiming at.
I actually got a slap to the back of my head when I accidentally didn't once

If your partner doesn't pay enough attention or is too slow - tough luck.
Of course the speed and such depend on how far the partners are progressed: If I were to hit full speed to a newbie, my teacher wold probably rip my head off.
But with a blackbelt? Punching in slow-mo and I know my teacher would be standing at my side, asking what I think I'm doing.

I never had annyone being annoyed when he got hit so far luckily, and vice versa I wasn't.
I got a hit to the nose once, because my partner was hitting there, where I was supposed to evade - wh had a laugh (the instructor asked what we were laughing about and started to after explaining) and kept going.
I didn't even consider to be mad or anything.


EDIT: A little more at topic:
Most of the time the group gets two different techniques to learn: One for the newer people, one for those who are of a higher grade (or if the teacher decides anyone can do that as well; I usually get lucky to do the advanced things); that or everyone does the same from the beginning - that depends on what is done.

A belt should show, what the carrier is at able to do - at least roughly.
But even I already know cases, where a higher graded (BB) person then I am does most worse then I do.
Just as there are people who can do better, then the belt would make one think.
BUT: When being on seminars and such and I have higher graded person in front of me - I admit it: If we were doing throws, for example, I wouldn't ask, if he can fall properly, because I expect that. I would ask a yellow belt (i.e.) though.

Last edited by Latikos; 13-Jan-2017 at 04:24 PM.
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