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  #16  
Old 08-Jun-2011, 01:54 PM
querist querist is offline
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Simon, thank you for researching that information for everyone.

As a physician, I'm going to have to disagree a little with that article.

The tonicity of a fluid usually refers to its electrolyte content. There are plenty of isotonic and hypertonic electrolyte drinks that have few to no carbohydrates in them at all.

Hypotonic is anything without the electrolytes. That can be Pepsi or water.

I will agree that you only really need electrolyte replacement after perspiring significantly. The "one hour of strenuous exercise" rule is not a good guideline because different people react differently. Perspiration is a good indicator. Generally, if you notice that you're sweating "quite a bit" then you need the isotonic or hypertonic sport drinks.

Water is best after lighter exercise (not much perspiration) because you're not as concerned about electrolyte loss.

Propel is an electrolyte drink with zero carbs, for example.

Gatorade have three different drinks out now - G1 (prepare), G2 (perform) and G3 (recover). G3 has protein as well as some carbs and still has a good electrolyte balance. G2 is "standard" Gatorade. I'll check out exactly what's in G1 tonight.

Also, be VERY careful with hypertonic drinks when you are EXHAUSTED. I'm not talking about the good "really tired" after a good workout. I'm talking about being so exhausted that you can hardly stand up on your own. If you're perspired so much that you are starting to feel weak, a hypertonic drink can cause severe stomach cramps and may cause you to vomit, causing you to lose more electrolytes. If you're so weak that you MUST sit down, then you need to take your electrolyte drink is small sips, or ideally dilute it 50/50 with water. (G2 is hypertonic and needs to be diluted this way in this situation.) Also, if you're that exhausted, do NOT drink "ice cold" anything. That may also cause stomach cramps and vomiting.

Be careful. There is some excellent advice out there online, but there is also some not so good advice out there. Just like the instructors who do the bouncing stretches believe they're helping their students but don't understand that they're causing muscle damage, there are many well-intentioned people who have web sites trying to give what they believe to be good, helpful advice. Please, for your own sake, check the sources or consult a properly qualified health-care professional about these things. It's YOUR body and YOUR health.
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  #17  
Old 08-Jun-2011, 06:02 PM
Microlamia Microlamia is offline
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Thanks Guerist for the informative post!
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  #18  
Old 08-Jun-2011, 06:56 PM
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Guerist, thank you for the professional advice. It is always appreciated here.
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  #19  
Old 09-Jun-2011, 01:21 AM
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Originally Posted by querist View Post
Simon, thank you for researching that information for everyone.

As a physician, I'm going to have to disagree a little with that article.
I agree with you there. It's a little bit simplistic. The tonicity of a solution in this case is going to factor in both salt and carbohydrate levels, with the salts having much more influence on this value. Therefore iso, hypo and hyper tonic solutions are more to do with the levels of salts rather than carbohydrate amounts. Particularly (as guerist mentioned) there are many carbohydrate free iso and hypo tonic drinks available.

And to go into even more detail, the type of carbohydrate in the drinks can also influence your choice of drink to match you chosen activity. It really depends on how pedantic you want to be about your choose of drinks in terms of how much background knowledge you need.

While it does help, I would advise people to also read through the links provided in the article to get a better idea.
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Last edited by righty; 09-Jun-2011 at 01:33 AM.
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  #20  
Old 09-Jun-2011, 01:32 AM
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Originally Posted by embra View Post

However, one beverage that I drink too much of is coffee, and wonder what affect my 2-3 cups a day has on me.

So apart from water and beneficial drinks e.g. sports drinks, what damage/benefit(if any) do tea/coffee have? Im sure alcohol is bad, but I only consume a small amount.

In terms of coffee it is going to depend on how you take it. Obviously the more milk or cream in there, the less water and hence less hydration. More importantly is the fact that caffeine is a diuretic. This basically means that it will make you urinate more, decreasing hydration.
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What about prebiotic/probiotic milk drinks? - e.g. yakult - do they do anything usefull at all?

The evidence is arguable here. It's known there a lot of flora in your gut which is what probiotics are meant to boost. However last time I checked there wasn't really any evidence that any live cultures from probiotic drinks and vitamins etc actually make it past your stomach (including acids and everything) alive and colonise your gut.
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  #21  
Old 09-Jun-2011, 01:12 PM
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@embra. Caffeine is not as bad as we one thought. I have a thread on the subject if you care to search fir it, alternatively the same information is available on my blog.
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  #22  
Old 22-Jun-2011, 01:41 PM
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For long training sessions, or training courses try this. Add to a bottle of water a pinch of salt and half a teaspoon of sugar, shake it up. You've got yourself an effective energy drink. It hydrates you and the small amount of salt and sugar can be easily absorbed by the body. It doesn't taste bad any it's as close to free as you can get. Don't get to bogged down with all the fancy stuff they put in isotonic drinks, most of it isn't doing you any favours. This drink has got me through many a four hour training course.
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  #23  
Old 22-Jun-2011, 02:31 PM
querist querist is offline
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Make sure you're properly hydrated...

Quote:
Originally Posted by embra View Post
The usefull things you find on MAP.

Regarding Hydration, other factors that will come into play are good kidney and urine functions (and bu implication, prostate in men) i.e. we must get rid of the liquid as well as absorb it.

So what can we do to get these functions working well?
Here is a 'trick' I learned from the US Marine Corps (and researched and verified that it's a valid approach):

The Marines will have these "urine hydration charts" posted at the urinals at their bases. I've seen these at Parris Island when visiting there. Since we do not have those charts or we don't want to look at the colour of our pee, we can use the "in the field" method, shown below.

If you suspect that you're dehydrated at all, drink enough water until you NEED to pee. Naturally, go pee. Then drink enough water so you have to pee AGAIN, and then, of course, pee. At that point, unless you have some serious problems, you should be adequately rehydrated.

Please be careful to drink slowly... don't try to drink too much too quickly or you can cause problems, especially if what you are drinking is just water (hypotonic - will draw electrolytes OUT of your system if you drink too much too quickly). This rehydration process is normally reserved for after serious exertion, such as after a long run/hike or a serious workout.
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  #24  
Old 22-Jun-2011, 02:41 PM
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Good start, but ...

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Originally Posted by nidan82 View Post
For long training sessions, or training courses try this. Add to a bottle of water a pinch of salt and half a teaspoon of sugar, shake it up. You've got yourself an effective energy drink. It hydrates you and the small amount of salt and sugar can be easily absorbed by the body. It doesn't taste bad any it's as close to free as you can get. Don't get to bogged down with all the fancy stuff they put in isotonic drinks, most of it isn't doing you any favours. This drink has got me through many a four hour training course.
@nidan82, that is a good, general purpose, "in a pinch" (pardon the pun) formula that will carry you through, but please remember that you lose more electrolytes than just sodium.

However, this is a good general formula and I am certainly not discouraging people from using it. It's easy to mix up and it's inexpensive. It sounds like something that would be good for during a workout instead of just plain water.

Again, what you suggest should work for most people, and it will certainly save money, but it is not ideal due to the lack of potassium.

As far as isotonic drinks are concerned, I guess it depends on what you are purchasing. Granted, the flavouring only makes it more palatable. I've had unflavoured proper isotonic drinks before (with both sodium and potassium in them) and the flavouring certainly helps. The sugar is there to help the taste more than anything, though after exertion some simple carbs won't hurt anyone. After a workout, you may want to include some protein as well to help the muscles recover or even build up a bit. (This is the theory behind the various "after workout" drinks that include protein.)

Disclaimer: Yes, I AM a doctor, but I'm not YOUR doctor. This post should not be considered as medical or clinical advice and in no way does this post establish a doctor-patient relationship. Please consult with your primary health-care professional before undertaking any exercise routine.
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  #25  
Old 22-Jun-2011, 03:50 PM
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I have often found that a couple of cold beers at the bar, after training, does the trick....... : )
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  #26  
Old 01-Aug-2011, 12:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simon s View Post
@embra. Caffeine is not as bad as we one thought. I have a thread on the subject if you care to search fir it, alternatively the same information is available on my blog.
I always thought caffeine actually dehydrates you.
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  #27  
Old 01-Aug-2011, 12:30 AM
querist querist is offline
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I always thought caffeine actually dehydrates you.
It irritates the bladder, causing you to urinate. It does not actually dehydrate so much as simply make you feel a stronger urge to urinate, hence the belief that it dehydrates you.
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  #28  
Old 16-Aug-2011, 12:24 PM
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AlexCurrell AlexCurrell is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nidan82 View Post
I have often found that a couple of cold beers at the bar, after training, does the trick....... : )
Alcohol is the worst thing for you while in training.
Eh, I don't know how seriously you take your training but what's the point of training if you're going to put the calories back on, shut down your body and kill off your brain cells. At the end of the day you essentially don't learn anything. /Rant.

Haha, don't pay too much attention to me though, alcohol is an addiction through my eyes as is smoking and drugs which is why I have never touched either in my entire life.

Thanks for the info, I'll be sure to drink lots of water before, during and after training.
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  #29  
Old 10-Dec-2011, 10:09 AM
Paulo123 Paulo123 is offline
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Thanks for sharing such a great information. It is really very informative and useful for me. I really like your post.

Last edited by Paulo123; 10-Dec-2011 at 10:12 AM.
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  #30  
Old 21-Dec-2011, 08:40 AM
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Generally I stick to Gatorade, as it really gave me a second wind during an exhausting exam. I stir away from caffeinated drinks at all times before, during, and after practice. I saw one brown belter drink about 350 ml of a known caffeinated energy drink, and while he had an energy boost during the first part of the exam, by the last part he was shaking so badly and he couldn't hold his arms steady that the examiner cut short the belt examination.
I wanted to share a recent read: coconut water is a very good sports drink. It's so pure that it was used as dextrose in WWII. Only concern is once the coconut is opened, the coconut juice/water rapidly ferments once exposed to open air. So no storing in bags during practice unless you want a sour taste. There are packaged/sealed bottles that can last longer, but better to read the fine print to be sure. Hope this helps.
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